Storm Door Guy

The Installation Expert


Every day I run into people that have a simple problem with their storm door that is causing a lot of frustration. If you are one of those people struggling with how to fix your storm door, or don’t know why it is doing what it is doing, then this page is for you. Here I address some of the common problems people experience with their doors and simple solutions to fix them. And if it’s not really a problem, I’ll tell you that too.


General Operation

How do I know if my storm door is left or right hinged

Storm doors are always measured and described with you standing outside looking at the door.

  1. A right-hinged door means if you are standing outside and looking at where the storm door will be, the hinges are on the right and the door handle is on the left.
  2. A left-hinged door means if you are standing outside and looking at where the storm door will be, the hinges are on the left and the door handle is on the right.

 

How do I make my storm door close faster or slower

There is an adjustment screw in the tip of the storm door closer piston. Take a phillips head screwdriver, insert it into the tip of the piston, and turn it clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust the speed of the door. Want to know which way to go for sure?

If your storm door is right hinged (meaning when your standing outside looking at the door, the hinges are on the right and the door handle is on the left:

  1. Turn the speed set screw in the tip of the closer counterclockwise (or towards you) to make the door close FASTER,
  2. Turn the speed set screw in the tip of the closer clockwise (or away from you) to make the door close SLOWER.

If your storm door is left hinged (meaning when your standing outside looking at the door, the hinges are on the left and the door handle is on the right:

  1. Turn the speed set screw in the tip of the closer counterclockwise (or towards you) to make the door close SLOWER,
  2. Turn the speed set screw in the tip of the closer clockwise (or away from you) to make the door close FASTER.

Still have questions? Check out my instructional video on how to adjust a storm door closer.

How do I operate the Larson Tradewinds roll screen

To reveal the screen in a Larson Tradewinds storm door, you must first unlock the top window by pulling the latch located on the top-middle part of the bottom glass panel. Pull this latch towards you, the reach up to the pull-down bar that is located on the top of the top glass. Pull down and voila! There’s the screen.

Still need help? Watch my video on how to operate the Larson Tradewinds roll screen.

How do I stop my storm door from squeaking

Oil the hinges with W4 or other silicone lubricant.

How far will my storm door open

Most storm doors will open to about 90 degrees. You can get them to open a little further by removing the door closers if you are moving large furniture or objects in and out of your home.

My closers make a loud “popping” or “clicking” noise when the storm door shuts

If this happens, the bracket that attaches the closer to the storm door is loose. Since it’s loose, the “popping” noise you hear is cause from the bracket sliding side to side. All you need to do is:

  1. Tighten the screws that hold the bracket to the storm door,
  2. Add more screws to the bracket, or
  3. Replace the screws with larger diameter ones.

My storm door won’t close and latch on it’s own with the entry door closed.

This is one of a storm door’s most common problems. I can’t tell you have many people have argued with me about doors closing and latching on their own when the primary (or entry) door is closed before the storm door closes.

From an attorney threatening to sue, builders and general contractors asking me if I’ve ever installed a storm door, to a scientist who actually installed 6 (yes, 6!) door closer pistons on his door in an effort to get the storm door to close and latch on it’s own, this problem drives type A personalities insane.

But it’s really not a problem at all …  in fact it’s simple physics.

Here’s how the problem starts. You leave through the front door and pull it shut behind you. You hold the storm door open; maybe with your foot or back while you lock the entry door. When done, you get out of the way and let the storm door close on it’s own. But it when it closes, it doesn’t latch. It’s stays open slightly. Now the Type A personality spends the next 4 days adjusting the speed of the door closer(s), trying to find the scientifically accurate balance to make the door close and latch on it’s own. If this is you … stop. Just stop. You’re going to give yourself a heart attack or a stroke. There are bigger things to worry about in life.

Here’s whats going on.

Assuming you have an all glass door (or the screen is not down), as the storm door closes it begins to build pressure between the glass and the entry door. Normally, a storm door will close about halfway, the closers (or pistons) then kick in and slow the door down a bit, and then it closes the rest of the way. But it won’t latch at the end.

As the storm door is closing, it forces the air that’s trapped between the two doors out. But there comes a point when the air can’t escape fast enough, so it builds up pressure and pushes back on the storm door and the glass, and that pressure build up forces the storm door to stay open. In the end, the air pressure wins and the storm door remains unlocked.

That’s why a storm door won’t latch if the entry door is closed first, and the reason you have to push it shut in order to get it to latch.

Want to fix that? Well, you have 3 options (ranked in order from hardest to easiest):

  1. Change physics. Sounds absurd, but in my experience people have demanded it.
  2. Put a screen in the storm door or open the window. This will break the pressure seal and allow the door to close and latch on its own. How much you have to leave the window open depends on the storm door, layout of your house, wind direction, how plumb and level your entry door is, what day of the week it is, what season, and a myriad of other factors you don’t control.
  3. Just remember to push the storm door shut when you leave. I mean really? If that’s the biggest problem you have to deal with every day, you’re doing great!

What brand of storm door is the best and how do you know

Best brands of storm doors in my opinion are as follows:

  1. Larson
  2. Pella
  3. Anderson
  4. Emco

How do I know? 14,000+ installs over 14 years. That’s how.

What do I clean the storm door with

For the storm door frame: dish soap and warm water.

For the glass: windex and paper towel or vinegar and newspaper. Do NOT use a harsh cleaner like ajax or comet.

For the handles: soap and water and brass polish if the handles are brass.

Where is my storm doors registration number

Most manufacturers put the storm door’s registration number on the inside of the hinge z-bar frame. To find it, open the storm door and look at the inside of the hinge z-bar. It will be somewhere there.

Here is where you can find most registration numbers for storm doors.

Here is where you can find most registration numbers for storm doors.

Why won’t my door close

There’s a couple reasons for this:

  1. The door closers need to be adjusted. Watch my video here.
  2. There is a vacuum being created between the storm door and the entry door. This means you have a good seal. To break the seal, put a screen in or roll it down. Watch my video here.
  3. The strike plate needs to be adjusted
  4. The door closers have been bent from hyper-extension, likely as a result of wind damage or the door being opened too far.
  5. The door is out of square so the door latch is not lining up with the strike plate or door latch.

132 Responses to FAQs

  • MATT NARESKI says:

    I have Andersen 3000 Series 36 In. Width White Door Brass Hardware Self-Storing Storm Door 2400. It has a retractable screen that goes up and down when moving the sorm window but now it’s stuck halfway up. When pressing the spring operated latches to move the window up or down it won’t move. it’s jammed or something else happened to it. Any ideas how I can fix this?

  • Jamie says:

    I have a Larson storm door that you can interchange a screen and the glass. As of late, the glass has been popping out of the door. It’s been over 100 degrees here for the past 2 weeks which I think has something to do with it because it’s never popped out this many times before. I was wondering what, if anything, I can do to make it stay in. The retainer strips are on correctly but they keep falling off in the heat. Can something be done?

  • Bob Letourneau says:

    We have an EMCO 100 storm door. Can I switch the location of the fixed and screen panels so that the screen is on top? I was able to pull the sliding glass and removed the screen and divider piece with no issue, but the upper glasses holder clips don’t look like they are removable.

  • Susan says:

    We had a Larson Tradewinds Storm door installed last week. The handle was installed wrong (we think). It only opens by lifting up and it should open by lifting up or down. Also, the dead-bolt has to lift up and left. It’s awkward. Can you please advise as to where the installer went wrong . . he’s a handy-man that we’ve hired over the years.

    Many thanks in advance.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Ssuan:

      Without seeing it, it’s hard to diagnose. From what you are describing the handle and lockset were either installed upside down, or the strike plate is set to low/high. Check to make sure the holes on the door latch and deadbolt line up. From the outside and with the storm door open, lock the deadbolt. Then close the storm door, and the deadbolt and door latch will hit the latch side frame of the storm door. Take a pencil and marke the tops and bottoms of the door latch and deadbolt on the frame. Open the door again and on those marks draw a horizontal line around the inside of the frame. This lines mark where the latch and deadbolt are hitting. If they fall in between the holes of the strikeplate, than the handle was improperly installed. If those lines dont fall in the holes, it’s astrikeplate issue. You can fu=rther test that by removing the strike plate (it’s about a 6″ long x 1/2″ wide metal plate held in place with 2 small screws on the inside of the latch frame.) Once its removed, try working the deadbolt and handle. If it works, that plate was set too high or low.

      SDG

  • John says:

    Thanks. Do you recommend installing a push bar guard myself to protect the screen? The big downside to that I guess is that I’d have to remove it every time I change the screen to the glass each year and it might wear the doorframe down?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      You can. Technically any modification voids the manufacturers warranty, but that’s about the only sticking point. Personally, my opinion is do what you need to do: your roof, your rules!

      SDG

  • Justin says:

    I have a storm door with a mortised lock (not sure which brand). The door works well except for the fact that it wont stay closed. The weight of the handle seems to make it drop down and turn, just enough to open the door. Can I get replacement springs for the mechanism inside? I cannot find a parts list or anything on the internet, and I am tired of locking it to keep it shut. Thanks.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Justin:

      Not know which brand it is makes it difficult. You might be able to jerry rig something to fit, but other that I’m afraid I can’t help.

      SDG

  • Dana Cole says:

    We sold our old storm door to a friend and have had problems with it ever since. I replaced the plastic hinge inserts twice, but when I checked the other day the top two were giving out again. Yesterday she called and said when she came home it was hanging by the closer. I suspect it was not latched properly and the wind caught it. Also when I inspected it, I found tears in the metal that holds the top hinge. That I think is the cause of the hinges failing over and over.

    This is an old bronze-colored aluminum door and I can’t find the brand name. I do know that the four hinges are four inches long and the hinge pins are spring-loaded plastic (I have replaced them twice). Where can I find a replacement for the part of the frame that supports the hinges? I am unable to find the plastic inserts any more either. Do you know where I can find them?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      That sounds like and old-school door. To be honest, I don’t know where you could find those replacement parts. Wish I had a better answer.

      SDG

  • Mary says:

    My boss – who buys and fixes up old houses for rental or resale – has three old storm doors that need some repairs. The top section is glass, the middle section is glass and screen, and the bottom section is metal. The concern is the middle section. The little things you squeeze or press to raise or lower the screens are broken, and need to be replaced, and so are the L-shaped pieces along the sides of the screens that presumably hold them in position once you have the window where you want it. She’s given me the task of finding the parts – or even what they are called – and how to get them, and how much they are. I am totally un-mechanically inclined and from what I’ve researched it seems the squeezy things are called the latch kit? and the L shaped pieces are expanders? No idea if that’s correct but from reading your site I suspect you will know what I’m describing. Please let me know what they are and where and how to get them, etc.

    Much thanks for any help,
    Mary

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Mary:

      I can help. Go to my ‘Store’ page, then go to ‘Find Replacement parts’, then go to ‘Screen Clips’. On page 2 at the bottom you will find both the ‘L’ brackets to hold the screen into place and at the bottom what is called a ‘slide-bolt’, the other parts you are looking for.

      Let me know if you need anything else!

      The Storm Door Guy

      • Mary says:

        She says the L-shaped piece is to allow the window to slide up and down a track to hold the window in place. The slide bolts seem to be what holds the windows in place once you move them up? Please let me know. She doesn’t recognize the L-shaped piece on any of your pages, but did recognize the slide bolts.

        Much thanks,
        Mary

        • The Storm Door Guy says:

          Yes, I don’t see any of the L-shaped pieces, so that’s either a manufacture thing or your local hardware store in the door hardware section.

          SDG

  • charlie says:

    tried it didnt work took inside fame off , window that sides up & down came out but other window & screen or seeded in to door thanks

  • charlie says:

    have a larson door 69008033 m 232 090903 grandkids keep pushing screen out can i take it apart and put screen on top

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Don’t know that number of door. have a pic? If there are 2 panels of glass and 1 screen in the door, where you have to pull two latches in the operative window towards the middle to get it to move up and down, then yes you should be able to flip it around. Otherwise, may want to consider a larson tradewinds or rollscreen model. Great for grandkids as the screen is in the top part of the door already where they can’t get at it.

      Storm Door Guy

  • ha alexander says:

    I have a wrought iron storm/security door. The door has two removable glass – top and bottom. The bottom glass is held in by a U shaped clip. Can you tell me where to find these clips?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Try looking in my store. Click on STORE – FIND REPLACEMENT PARTS – SCREEN CLIPS. Probably on page 2.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Rob says:

    Hey Storm Door Guy, I’ve got a full glass storm door that is original with our 1986 townhouse. The storm door is an ankle-biter / butt-slapper, that is to say every time you open the storm door to unlock the front door, the storm hits you hard in the butt or in the ankles. It is sooo annoying. I am a handy-enough man and have tried several different “Heavy Duty” pneumatic door closers, with no luck. I have just tried two brand new pneumatic closers (screw tightened all the way on each) on the top and bottom of the door, and still get the same result. Although now after the door hits you, it bounces back and then slowly closes. Do you know if they make professional grade closers, aka hydraulic closers that can fit between a storm door and front door?

    Sincerely,
    -Rob

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Oh yes, the ankle and butt biter doors. I know them well. From what you describe, the closers may not be mounted properly. Not to question your handyman skills, but that has been my experience. If you replaced the closers without replacing the jamb and door brackets this may be the cause. Also, some pistions you have to “prime” before installation. That means before it goes on the door, mount the pistion and bracket to the entry door jamb and pull on it until it extends all the way and release it once. Then attach it to the storm door.

      My question is “Does your Storm door open completely to a 90+degree angle or not with the new closer on it?”

      If so, then it’s the closers problem.

      If not, then close the storm door all the way, and remove the 2-3 screws holding the closer bracket on the door. Let the pistion go back to a full rest position making sure the sliding washer that holds the door open is slide as far back as possible to let the piston retract fully. Then put bracket back on the piston and reattach it to the storm door. Operate the door and adjust the speed as needed.

      If that doesn’t work, you can find a commercial closer (big massive things, but I guess it would work).

      If that doesn’t work, try 6 beers and a 5lb. sledge hammer.

      The Storm Door Guy

      • Rob says:

        Thanks for the tips, I did go back to a single closer instead of two and reset the closer per your instructions with slight improvement. I did install the new jamb and door brackets so that I used all the new hardware. After re-reading the directions, the manufacturer recommended having a little tension on the closer by placing the hold-washer right by the “lugs” and then securing to the closed storm door. I guess this helps close the door properly. I purchased a Wright Products White Heavy duty Door Closer (the same as V150WH on your website pictures of closers – but looks like that part of your site is down maybe or under construction?). I see you have hydraulic closers listed. Honestly I thought closer manufacturers were lying when their packages said hydraulic, as they looked identical to the pneumatic ones. Of course in the big box home store I visit they only carried one brand of each type. If I had seen that Wright makes both types I would have believed sooner. Perhaps you can recommend a new closer that I can purchase from your site that might out perform my Heavy duty pneumatic closer? I would like to fix this issue without the sledge hammer, as the beers won’t last as long as my door frustrations, lol. Thanks again for your help and expertise.

        • The Storm Door Guy says:

          Rob:

          First, Thanks for letting me know that part of my website was down. I corrected it.

          Second, you might want to try a more industrial closer. Here’s a decent example:

  • Terry says:

    Thanks. One more question: I am not sure of which door material is better. Are you a fan of the composite door (forever) or aluminum (tradewinds)? And (I guess that’s two questions!) wouldn’t just using the screen in the top part of the highview take care of there not being heat trapped between the doors? I’m sorry if these are dumb questions, but I am a novice at this!

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      I like the extruded aluminum personally. And yes, you are right, as long as the window is down and the screen in the highview is showing you are fine — not a dumb question at all!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Terry says:

    I am interested in purchasing a highview storm door. The entry door has glass at the top. I have looked at the Larson Tradewinds and the Emco Forever. Which one would be more durable? My door faces the west. Thanks for any advise you can give me.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Well, I’ve replaced many “Forever” doors. Again, I’m biased towards Larson, but they are a great door. Since you face west, just remember to leave the window cracked a bit in the hot summer months. That will allow the hot air trapped between the front and storm doors to escape. Not doing that may cause your entry doors to warp in the future. I’d say honestly the decision is probably 6 of on e and 1/2 doen of the other (essentially the same).

      The Storm Door Guy

  • miriam says:

    I need to install a pet door for a large lab, therefore need a partial view storm door _WITHOUT A SCRREN…know of any???
    In addition front entrance already has double doors, can I just buy one storm door with a flat panel for easier pet door installation???

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Either a larson LARGE DOG pet door with the door already installed, or get a wood core storm door and cut out a hole for the dog and try to find a dog door installation kit. Don’t know of any but they are probably out there.

      As for the front, both doors have to be the same style for them to work. ie, replacing one means replacing both.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Sandy says:

    We just moved into a new home (new to us, 18 years old). There are storm doors on the front and back doors. They are the older kind with the glass on top and screen on the bottom. I’d like to reverse them to have the screen on top and glass on the bottom. How do I do this?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Without knowing the brand and seeing them, hard to tell. If they have an operative window where you have to pull 2 horizontal metal pegs towards the center of the window to get it to move, just do that and instead of moving the window up, pull it toward you so it come out and then rotate the window 45-90 degrees to get it to come out of its track. Then take out the other glass and screen panel the same way, flip then around, and put them back in.

      But without being their hard to describe, so take my advice with a grain of salt because it very well may be impossible to do.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Les says:

    Hi…we’re about to purchase a retractable screen door and the usual choices are the Larson Tradewinds, Pella Montgomery, and Anderson 3000. Which of these do you recommend as far as being the most durable/functioning door; since they’re all about the same price, that is not an issue. Right now we’re leaning towards the Larson w/eTouch, but we just want to make sure it’s the right choice. Also, we do have a 2 year old at home if this makes a difference…thanks for your help!

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Les:

      Personally I’d go with the Larson Tradewinds–minus the E-Touch lock. The Tradewinds in my mind is the best door by far, and I’ve installed a LOT of them. It’s probably about 80% of what I put in anymore. But avoid the e-touch lock. Good concept on paper, bad concept in practice and reality. During the winters I have found the batteries freeze up/die because of the cold. Had a guy who’s power went while he was away. When he got home the garage door wouldn’t open because the power was off, and the batteries in his lock were dead, so the front door wouldn’t open. Bummer.

      That’s my 2 cents,

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Walter says:

    I read that you do a lot of installs for Lowe’s for the Larson/Pella lines. You mentioned that you may be a little more partial to the Pella because of quality and the 20 year warranty (yet you mention problem with the rollscreens and glass giving way) .

    What are your thoughts on the difference in thickness of the the frames ( Larson being thicker). does it affect durability/quality in any way? Also, Larson has the overlapping frame to hide the hinges etc. and Pella doesn’t. Do you feel this is a negative toward the Pella?

    Just for fun, if you were to purchase a storm door today with the roll down screen, and considering all the pros and cons of each, would you by the Larson or Pella?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Larson Tradewinds hands down.

      The covered hinges is not that big of a deal, just aesthetic. But for durability, rigidity, performance, and lack of issues with the rollscreen, go with the Tradewinds. Now if you wanted a full-view door where you take out the glass and put the screen in, hands down the Pella.

      The Storm Door Guy

    • Walter says:

      Thanks for your candor. That was my choice too, but my wife won the arguement. She liked the more full view area of the Pella (less framing than the larson) and she was also concerned that we would forget to unlock the screen before trying to pull it down thus breaking the cheap plastic mechanism. With the pella, the locking mechanism is part of the pull down handle (though probably just as “cheap”). Also a factor was that since we live on a hill with high winds, the metal piston brackets of the pella vs. the plastic for the Larson played a role in the decision making process. My arguement – if you let the door go, it’s gone with the wind whether plastic or metal.

      Time will tell.

      Thanks again!!

  • Jacob says:

    My door jam has an aluminum capping and it seems that it’s not allowing the door, Anderson 3000, to be flush and level uniformly. We’ve been flattening the latch side so that the door sneaks in without catching and bending the drip cap so that the door clears far enough. Are we I trouble?
    Deptford NJ

  • Lisa says:

    I planned on buying two Larson Secure Elegance security storm doors for my front double doors. I noticed your comment about the plastic hinges being a negative. Is this issue bad enough that you recommend I go with another option and, if so, which one? I’m somewhat limited because I plan to buy at Lowes and have it installed by Lowes and there aren’t a lot of white full-view storm doors there to choose from.

    Thanks for your advice.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Lisa:

      With double doors there are no good options. The slidebolt locks on the non operative doors are cheaply made, and that is the weak point across all models. That being said, Lowe’s recently brought on a new vendor called West Tennessee Security doors. They are a custom steel security door, but their slide bolts are built into the non operative door and they are 3/4″ steel rods( NOT plastic), which makes them AWESOME! It’s a pricey door, but if security is a concern I can highly recommend them.

      The Storm Door Guy

      • Lisa says:

        Thank you for your reply. Security is nice but not a necessity. Would the Larson Interchangeable Storm Door (Model #34952032) work better for a double door than the Secure Elegance? I think the West Tennessee Security doors are a bit out of my price range.

        P.S. I bought the Larson Tradewinds last year for my back door and you’re right on the mark. Great storm door!

        • The Storm Door Guy says:

          That would be up to you. Personally, I think the Tradewinds double door would be the easiest because you don’t have to worry about changing anything out. If you want a full view door like that, I would go with the Pella because the glass is more secure.

          The Storm Door Guy

  • DMK says:

    I have a Larson full-view screen away model where the screen rolls up and stores in the top of the door. It has been installed and functioning great for about a year. Last week we had a problem that I haven’t been able to fix; the window is now open (screen is dow) but I can’t get the spring tension to engage when I try to close the window. When I lift the window the screen will come out of the screen guides because it doesn’t retract as the window is lifted. Any suggestions on how to fix this?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      The screen has to be replaced (should be manufacturer defect, so call Larson and give them your door number which is on the inside of the hinge part of the frame). They’ll send out a replacement screen. And a word of advice, if Lowe’s installed it, call them and have them deal with it. Otherwise, call them and have one of their installers replace it. Larson will say you can do it yourself, but don’t listen to them. It’s as easy as giving yourself a root canal. You don’t need the headache.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Sal Raciti says:

    Have a Andersen 2000 series storm door. What’s the best way to remove the glass panel and replace it with the screen and visa versa. Also is it possible to purchase a glass/ screen combo

  • john says:

    I am looking to install 3 storm/screen doors (a double french door and a single door) and was quoted $2,000 for materials/labor….the doors are Larson full view….I think they retail for about $300. Should I just go to Lowe’s and have them install it? Is there a concern about Lowe’s not doing it right or the product from Lowe’s being of lesser quality?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      John:

      I would definitely go to Lowe’s. But I am biased because I install for them. As far as lesser quality or install, I can tell you that Lowe’s backs up their installation for a year, and they are VERY picky about who they hire to install. If their installers drop below a 95% customer satisfaction rating their contract with Lowe’s is threatened. Also, Lowe’s is Larson’s largest buyer of storm doors, so I wouldn’t worry about lesser quality (in fact quite the opposite–when Lowe’s speaks Larson listens).

      Hope that helps,

      The storm door guy

    • john says:

      Hi, so I the Larson full view storm/screen doors installed by a Lowe’s rep but now that they are in I notice that any sort of pushing on the screen itself (I have two small children and its hard to stop them) caused the screen frame to practically pop out of the sides of the retaining strips on the side of the door frame….is it normal for that to happen….just seems a bit flimsy to me. Also, can I buy a metal strip to go across the middle of the door so the kids will at least push that instead of the screen when going out of the house?

      • The Storm Door Guy says:

        John:

        Good question. That is the way the doors are built, unfortunately. It is something i have come across many many times. There is is no metal bar that larson makes that you can put across the screen. As for the part where it pulls out, the only solution I have seen is by Pella (Larson actually owns their storm door division now). They had “screen retainer pins” that you would have to remove the plastic pieces that hold the screen into the door, drill a 1/8″ hole through the frame of the screen into the storm door itself, and then put these little pins (basically they were cotter pins, or I’m sure you could get a 1″ framing or roofing nail to do the same thing) into the holes you just drilled on either side of the screen. That would hold it tight, then you reinstall the plastic strips that hols the screen into the door and those pins are covered by the strips. Worked great, you may want to try it. FYI I drilled the holes about 36″ up from the bottom of the screen on the left and right sides and inserted the pins.

        The Storm Door Guy (SDG)

  • Deb says:

    Hi, I am having a lot of work done to my home – my contractor suggested Harvey Storm Doors – I originally had picked out Larsen Tradewinds doors which I had at my old house and loved the fact the screen was self storing etc. The Harvey Storm Doors also have the self storing screen feature but I know nothing about these doors.

    In your opinion which one is a better door?

    Thanks!

    Deb

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Deb:

      Honestly, I don’t know anything about Harvey storm doors. They are not available in my area and I’ve never seen or installed one. My personal feeling is better the door you know than the door you don’t, but take my opinion with a grain of salt.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Jordan says:

    Hi – I recently installed a new Larson Storm door. Everything went well except I cant get the door to latch shut when the front door is closed due to air pressure. The door latches fine when the front door is open. I am afraid the wind will catch it one day and rip it off the house if someone in my family forgets to pull it shut after leaving the house. Any suggestions?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Jordan:

      I wish I had better news for you, but there is no way to overcome that. That is my most frequently asked question after installs, but that is just the physics of the door–there’s no way around it. If the screen is down and the screen is showing, it gives that trapped air a place to escape to and will work fine. So unfortunately either leave the screen in/down or just push the door shut behind you on your way out.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Marie says:

    My husband and I are in the market for a storm door for the front of our house. Unfortunately, we don’t seem to have the standard opening. The frame openings for where the door would line up aren’t level with each other. The door has a window on the right side (when you’re looking at the front of the house) and the space between the entrance and the window is where you’d put the door, but it doesn’t go out as far as the other side, where the storm door should close. If you look at the Larson “How to measure for a storm door guide” you’ll see that it shows a picture of a standard door opening from an aerial point of view. Our door has the left side, looking down on it, jutting out further than the right right side. Any help would be great!

    Thanks,

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Hi Marie!

      What you have is a common problem with entry doors that have sidelites (that’s the window that shares a frame with your storm door. What you have to do is add a 2×4 piece of wood to that jamb, a term we call “firring out.” I haven’t had a chance to make a video of it yet, but if you are somewhat handy is should be fairly simple. Basically, measure at the top of where the narrow frame is. You want to see how recessed it is from the header part of your exterior trim. Typically it is either 3/8″, 1 1/4″ – 1 3/8″, or 3 1/4″ish.

      Then you cut the 2x4x8 to that measurement (cut it the wide way. What you’ll end up with is a piece of wood that is 1 1/2″ wide x however deep your measurement was.

      Next, measure the height of that recessed jamb from the threshold on the bottom to the underside of the top piece of exterior trim. Cut your 2×4 to that height (you may have to notch out the back side a little bit, then set on the jamb and screw it down. I use 3″ brass screws for anything over 1″ deep.

      Voila, your frame is now flush on all 3 sides, ready for a storm door install.

      All the best,

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Danielle says:

    We had a Larson retractable screen door put in (not professionally installed) and it has given us problems ever since. The screen door frame never sat properly around the back door. If you close the screen door too tightly, it gets jammed and you pretty much have to put your hip into it to open it. With all of the ‘hip action’ that we have been putting into it, the door frame around the house is starting to come away (you can see a gap in between the house and the frame and see the nails). The caulking around the frame is starting to come off too. I would like to remove the old screen door, fix up the original door frame and re-caulk it. Can this be done ourselves and what steps should we take to do this? I have taken pictures to show someone at Lowe’s to see if they can guide us in the right path.

  • ANGIE says:

    I NEED TO REPLACE MY STORM DOOR, BUT IT A STRONG WIND HAD BLOWN IT OPEN AND IT PULLED THE BRACKET OUT OF THE FRAME. HOW DO I FIX THAT SO THAT MY NEXT DOOR WON’T BE GOING INTO STRIPPED OUT SCREW HOLES?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Angie:

      When you install the new bracket, just move it back or forward slightly from where the old one was. Predrill new holes with a 1/8″ drill bit and but in longer screws (I use 3″brass screws personally). To cover up the old holes, some people just fill them with caulking. I find that inserting a wooden golfing tee (the kind you put your golf ball on), tapping it with a hammer until it is set in place, and then cutting it flush with the door jamb works best and looks the nicest especially after repainting. Just a little trick of the trade.

      All the best!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Harvey says:

    I need a storm door for a double door. What do I look out for? The manufacturers don’t show or discuss double doors.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      The biggest thing is the slidebolts on the non-operative door. For larson, the slidebolts are large, which is good, but they are made of plastic, which is bad. Pella, on the other hand, has small slidebolts, but there are metal.

      The next thing is realize that double/french doors don’t seal very well no matter what you do. It’s just the nature of the beast. Now if you are asking for a personal opinion, I’d go with a larson tradewinds.

      The Sorm Door Guy

  • Patti says:

    We have a Pella storm door with a screen at the top that pulls down. My issue is this… the glass is coming out of the gasket and dropping down which is making the frame that hold the glass in place come apart. Is it possible for you to help us out with this problem. Thank you, Patti

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Patti:

      This is a common problem with the Pella rollscreens. I call them the guillotine models, because when the frame and glass finally separate, the glass falls down and makes a crash noise, while the screen shoot straight up into the door frame and unwinds.

      It is a manufacturers defect, so call the Pella and give them your door number (it’s located on a black and gold sticker on the inside of hinge frame of the storm door. It’s like 10 or more digits long. Then find a storm door installer to replace it by either calling the phone number at the top of my website, or Lowe’s and pay a trip charge (like $50). DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REPLACE IT BY YOURSELF, despite what the manufacturer says. You don’t need that headache, trust me!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • scott rudisill says:

    Message:
    first off ive installed hundreds of storm doors. all brands. I recently
    put a rollscreen storm door on my house. My gripe is why don’t wind chains
    come with ALL doors. im assuming to cut corners cost wise. l Thats
    great for areas where there is NO wind. consequently my CHEAP and i do
    mean cheap plastic closer bracket sheared off. and this manufacturer doesnt cover wind
    damage.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Scott:

      I’m totally with you. Wind chains SHOULD be included with every door. That would reduce so many problems. It’s amazing how a $5 part can solve the $500 problem of replacing your entire front door. As far as the plastic brackets, that’s one of the few things I don’t like about larson doors. It seems since they off-shored the manufacturing of the closers that they cheapened the product. I wish they would go back to the metal ones. But what do I know. I think they should also include a little bottle of touch-up paint as well for small scratches. But the rep I spoke with said “It’d cost too much.” Really? An extra 25 cents? wow.

  • Jill says:

    Hi There,
    I am looking for a 42 inch storm door, finding the retail stores have very few options that can be custom made to this width. Do you have any suggestions for this wide of door? Ie. material type we should go with considering the weight, hinge type, etc? Thank you!

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Jill:

      42″ is definitely a wide door, though it should be a standard (but definitely not stock) door. You may try a more custom builder like Provia doors, you may have better luck. Or try calling the manufacturers directly (I have installed 42″ Pella doors before.) Sometimes the people at the retail stores aren’t that well informed.

      As for material, when you are going that wide stick with an extruded (hollow) aluminum. In my mind lighter is better, because the door will sag quite a bit just from the sheer weight of it.

      Hope that helps!

      The Storm Door Guy.

  • Cam says:

    I saw your response on the 9th of Feb to Margaret regarding plastic sidebolts and was trying to figure out if you meant that the Larson Secure Elegance had plastic ones or the Anderson? I am thinking about purchasing the Larson for my back door and security is my main concern. I had thought about a sliding screen door as the doorway faces west and gets alot of heat buildup due to the Texas sun but am thinking Low E glass in the Larson might take care of much of that. What do you think? Thanks in advance.

    • Cam says:

      Should have said the keepsafe glass might help with heat buildup not LowE glass, sorry for the confusion.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Cam:

      The plastic slidebolts are only used if you have double(also called french) doors. If you are installing a single storm door, you won’t have to worry about them.

      In response to the other question, the Low E glass would cut down on heat buildup, and the KeepSafe glass gives you the security. My advice is get both. The Secure Elegance comes by default with the KeepSafe glass, but I’m pretty sure you can get the Low-E coating on it for just a little extra.

      Hope that helps!

      The Storm Door Guy

      • Cam says:

        It does help. Thanks for the advise. Great website by the way, alot of information. Keep up the good work.

  • Debbie Hunter says:

    What is the best security storm door? I am looking for something without bars with safety glass and a dead bolt locking system.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      By far the Larson Secured Elegence. No bars, does have laminated glass, and a 3-point locking system. Found at your local Lowe’s hardware store.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Lynda says:

    I am trying to find/purchase a replacement full glass insert for a storn door. My glass insert was shattered by a stone spit from a lawn mower. I can find a deluge of info on new storm doors, & have been on the websites of Larson and Anderson. They are pushing new purchases–but my door is fairly new, and the screen, latches and closer all work perfectly. I just need to buy a glass full lite replacement. How/where do I find this? Lynda

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Have you called the manufacturer directly? You should be able to order spare parts by calling them. But in the event that they try to upsell you, I’d contact a local glazier (glass company). They should be able to create a new glass panel without any problem.

      The storm door guy

  • Blane Beadnell says:

    I am looking for a 3 X 8 storm door. I want glass and screen combo ( ventillating )
    so i can slide open the glass and let the breeze in during Spring and Summer.
    It would be nice to have wrought iron frame too. I can be reached at 303-772-7457….

    I am in Colorado. Can you email me a few names, numbers, websites, ….I am having a hard time finding this.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Blane:

      Honestly in my years of doing this I have never seen an 8′ ventilating storm or security door. From what I am told no manufacturer makes that model that tall (and I have not found one that does on my own.) Why, I have no idea. For the roll screen models my guess is no one can reach that high to move the window down.

      Great question, but I have no answers for you, sorry.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Bob r. says:

    Just had a Pella full view storm door installed. Installer says it won’t close on its own when front door is shut due to air lock. We must reach back and manually push it so it clicks shut when leaving. Is this correct? Seems crazy.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Bob:

      That is absolutely correct. Just the physics of the door. What happens is the the storm door closes faster than the air that is trapped between the two doors can escape. So that air gets backed up, causing excess pressure. Eventually the pressure becomes strong enough to prevent the door from closing by causing it to lose it’s momentum. Hence, you have to push the storm door shut in order to get it to latch when you are leaving.

      On the flip side this also means you have a good seal. To test that theory, if your door is the roll screen model, you can open the window as far as it can go and try to work the door. In that case the trapped air has some place to escape to via the screen and the door should close and latch on its own.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Linda says:

    Hi. I am looking for a storm door that will be getting a lot of use. What would you recommend. The opening is 36×80. I am looking at a Larson First Impression and the Anderson 4000.

  • Margaret says:

    We are installing a new 8′ entry door with a security storm door. Any preference between the Larsen Secure Elegance and the Anderson security door? Also, reading the earlier questions and answers about sun and ventilation, do you have an opinion on whether a steel or fiberglass entry door would be better with the non-ventilating security door, which receives direct afternoon sun?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      No preference really. I have yet to install an Anderson double security door, but having installed hundreds of larson doors, I can say that their slidebolts on the t-astrigal leave something to be desired. They are plastic and I am always having problems with them either working their way loose or in some instances breaking altogether. After all, that is the weak point on all double doors, the slidebolts on the nonoperative door.

      As far as steel or fiberglass, I’d say color is more important than type of material (but stay away from a wood door). If you can get as close to white as possible and stay away from black, that would be best. I actually installed a set of double black storm doors over black entry doors on the south side of a house with no covering. Within 2 weeks the doors had literally started to uninstall themselves (the screws were backing out on their own) because of the massive expansion and contraction of the metal due to the 100+ degree days and cool nights.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Lisa says:

    Hello
    Any advise or feedback on the secure elegance storm door? I was impressed with the utube demonstration.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      It’s a great security door. Have installed hundreds of them. The only problem is it’s really heavy because of the dual glass layer. So it’s a little more challenging to initially install. I love it because it’s a security door with the look of what I call prison bars. And good luck to anyone who thinks they can get through it. If memory serves, it also comes with an additional $500 break in warranty.

      I’d recommend it for sure.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Larry says:

    I just got a quote from a Pella contractor for their 4601 storm door… installed is $1650! I see that Lowes has a similar Pella full view storm door for around $300 although its 1-1/4″ thick instead of 1-5/8″. Is it worth paying that much more the extra thickness? Is the extra 3/8″ making the door that much stronger? My gut reaction is to buy the 1-1/4″ door.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      You should call the police because you are about to get robbed.

      $1,650?!!! Really?! For a storm door! It would be cheaper for you to fly ME out to wherever you are and pay me to do it!

      I think I made my point. Personally, I wouldn’t let that guy back on my property. Go with your gut, it’s leading you in the right direction.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Jeff Poindexter says:

    I am looking for two 30 inch Larson storm doors (full view) and a French door kit to have installed. Can you help?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Jeff:

      Best I can tell you is check your local Lowe’s store. I just installed a set today. If you don’t have a Lowe’s nearby, call the manufacturer number under Brands–Larson, and they can tell you the closest retailer.

      All the Best!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Scott Demarest says:

    I purchased a rather expensive full view Pella storm door about 10 years ago. It appears the internal latching system broke or stripped recently as the handle will no longer fully retract the latch. I took the handles off but there does not appear to be a straight forward way to replace the plastic parts without taking the entire door apart. Based on posts I’ve found on the internet, it appears this is not an uncommon problem with Pella storm doors. Any suggestions?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Scott:

      From the problem you describe, it does sound like it would qualify for as a manufacturer defect. Most of Pella’s warranties are 20 years, so I would first try calling their homeowner helpline at 1-800-374-4758 and give them the door # which is found on a white or gold sticker on the inside jamb of the hinge part of the frame. Just open your door and look at the hinges and you should see it.

      Hope that helps!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Richard says:

    Dan; In my prior post what I meant to ask is: Which brand door model, or other brand door model, would you give your highest recommendation. Again, thanks.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Richard:

      Thanks for the great question!

      I think it comes down to if you have little one’s or not. The reason I say that is the Anderson quick release may be a bit to easy for a child to accidentally push up on the handle and have the potential of the glass falling on them. That being said, I am partial to the Pella. Pella is in my mind the Cadillac of storm doors, and with their 20 year warranty you have a secure investment. Something you may want to consider is getting Low-E glass. Because of the way your door faces, getting a low-e coating on it will dramatically reduce the heat buildup in the summer if you choose to leave the glass in (some people don’t like putting in the screen as it can be cumbersome especially on the oversized doors.)

      Hope that helps!

      The Storm Door Guy

      • carol says:

        I have a Pella storm door and bought it because I have always heard that Pella was a great name. Well, let me tell you that this door STINKS! The handle comes off all the time and it does not close all the way on it’s own. I would not recomment a Pella anything to anyone. Now I have to replace it because it also ices up all winter long and I have no idea what to replace it with.

        • The Storm Door Guy says:

          Wow. Sorry to hear you are having so many problems with it. The handle falling off is definitely install related. The set screw that holds the handle onto the spindle is not tight enough. Not closing all the way on it’s own, well, that could also be installed related. And icing up, well, that could actually be install related too if there wasn’t a good seal.

          You might try a heavier door like a Larson Secured elegance, or even an Anderson or Emco.

          The Storm Door Guy

  • Richard says:

    Dan; I have a 36×96 entry door that faces west. A majority of the doors in my development are 36×96. In the winter, the wind driven snow stacks up against the lower portion of the door. In the summer, the door and handle are very hot to the touch. I went to Lowe’s today and learned that I am limited to a full view storm door and that the size requires a custom door. One neighbor has a Pella; another has an Anderson. A nice feature of the Anderson is the quick release for changing the window or screen. The Pella requires removing each of the four strips that secure the window/screen. I want a door that will provide the best weather/sun protection. I under stand that the screen should be used in the hot summer when the entry door is closed to prevent heat build-up between the storm door and entry door. I am prepared to spend up to $1000 for the door and installation. Which door, or other brand door, would you give your highest recommendation? Thank you.

  • kel mac says:

    hi, we are looking at a larson retractible screen storm door, but they only offer the ‘universal’ door, for which you have to drill the holes for handle/lockset. My husband, who is VERY handy, is still concerned about drilling with a 1 1/2″ paddle bit on a metal door. He finds it hard to believe they market that as easy installation, and would prefer a door with holes pre-drilled. We have also read several reviews by other people who ruined their doors trying to drill the holes out. What say you?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      GREAT QUESTION!

      This is a hot button of mine. I hate that these manufacturers market their products as “easy install.” The Pella version easy hang doors even go so far as to show a lady in high heels with a drill in their advertisements. Really?! It’s borderline false advertising.

      This is where a bit of common sense comes in. I could probably do a root canal myself too, but there’s a reason I don’t! While I’m a GREAT storm door installer, I’m a HORRIBLE dentist!

      Now I’ll get off my soapbox.

      What your husband is thinking is totally normal. In fact, even the most die hard do-it-yourselfers usually give in right at the point they have to drill through the door for the door latch, and that’s when they call me. As long as you follow the template, you are fine. Predrill with a 1/8″ bit and then stick the spade bit in there. If you predrill a hole any larger the bit just jumps around and that’s where the problems start. Now 1 1/2″ sounds a bit big to me, I have never seen larger than a 3/4-7/8″ bit used. If it is a tradewinds, use a 3/4″ bit in the inside and a 7/8″ bit on the outside, despite what the instructions say.

      If you want a door with holes predrilled, try a Pella Select Ashford, or Larson Signature Series. No drilling required 🙂

      All the Best

      The Storm Door Guy

  • todd says:

    I recently bought a larson savannah 36 in door from my local lowes. got it installaed with a little work. but my son whom is a toddle has managed to lock me and my wife out, luckily a window was unlocked. Is there any way that i could switch the handleset out for a keyed one. if so what type, and where can I get it. Many thanks for your time and info. It is all greatly appreciated

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Todd:

      Unfortunately there is not another lockset that will work on the larson Savanah. I have run into the same problem, except I have locked myself out. And since there is no fail safe, well it’s a pain. The easiest way I know of is to leave the top window unlocked. When it happens, you can pull the window down from the outside. Then, grab the screen (you can get your fingers around the sides because it just sits in a track and is not secured) and pull it down a little more. That will create an opening to get your other hand through in order to reach down and unlock the door on the inside. That’s the best way I have found to do it. Hope that helps.

      The Storm Door Guy

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      The best way is to look in the original owners manual. If so, it will have the Energy start logo somewhere on it (usually the front.) Next bet is to call Emco directly.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • maureen mcculloch says:

    I am looking for a paintable exterior storm door, full or 3/4 glass. Something that has a woodgrain finish e.g fiberglass. My three dogs are always jumping on it, so need something that i can paint when needed.

    Thanks
    Maureen

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      I don’t know of a paintable storm door that any of the big guys make (Larson, Pella, Andersen/Emco). You may want to try a custom door manufacturer. Sorry I couldn’t answer this one. Emco used to have the Forever door, but turns out they didn’t last nearly as long as they thought so they were discontinued.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Aaron says:

    Hey! I’m wondering if you’ve ever seen a storm door mounted landscape, used as a large window, with an additional “frame” with another deadbolt “female” point that would allow the whole door to swing up- or, more likely, down. I know this is likely not a permit-friendly idea, but- given over-kill load-bearing reinforcement on the wall- my question remains: have you seen it? Can it be done? Thanks.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Aaron:

      Interesting question. Have I seen it? No, never. Can it be done? Yes, I’m sure it can. It would be a lot of fun to try too. You would need at least 1×1 exterior trim around the window to mount the door and frame to. It would also leak like sieve because the drip cap that is normally on the top of the door would now be on the side, and the bottom expander with weather stripping would be on the opposite side, not the bottom.

      And yes, it’s not permit friendly and no contractor in their right mind would do it for liability reasons, but as a homeowner … your roof YOUR rules.

      If you attempt it, keep me updated. I’d love to post pictures of it on my website if you are successful.

      Thanks!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Gerry says:

    I am about to replace a $300+ Pacesetter (now out of business) storm door; it has been rendered inoperable due to the failure of a hinge. The hinges have plastic and springs on the inside; a well qualified contractor could not find parts to replace the damaged hinge. Without the hinge support the door sags so cannot close.
    When purchasing a new door I want the most durable hardware – but with key details on the interior it is not possible to know what the components are. Any suggestions. Thanks.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Gerry:

      Honestly, my best advice would be to contact the manufacturer of the new door and purchase 1 or 2 extra hinge z-bars and just store them. That way when they break over time, you can replace them. Most of the hinges on new doors are pressure set at the factory, meaning changing them yourself is near impossible. Don’t know if I answered your question but I hope it helps!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Sol Bress says:

    I have an EMCO door about 17 years old. The weather stripping on the edge of the door (top of door to bottom of door) has worn out. Called EMCO, who told me they no long manufacture this door (or parts).

    Any suggestions?

    Thank you.

    Sol Bress
    sol@bress.tv

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Sol:

      Go to a hardware store and in the door hardware section you can find a roll of weather stripping that has double sided sticky tape on it. Just cut it to the length you need, remove the plastic from the tape, and stick it on the frame. a $10 solution to a simple problem.

      Thanks for posting!

  • Caroline says:

    I am trying to decide between a Larson 349-20 (Secure Elegance) and an Anderson 4000 series fullview door. My concern is getting the most energy efficient door and also dealing with some slight possible heat buildup. My navy colored, metal front door is 3/4 beveled glass, faces southwest and gets about 2.5 hours of bright, tree filtered sun during the summer. It is under a 6 foot deep covered porch. I have looked at Falcon and Equalizer (because of their fullview ventilating capabliilties) but costs are prohibitive ($800-$900+). I have been told by two different companies that given my particular set-up a “thermopane” or “dual glass” door will satisfy the heat problem. Any thoughts on the Larson vs. the Anderson…especially since there is no difference in cost? The Anderson does come with a screen though (would probably never use). Thanks!

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Caroline:

      I would say the main concern is to decide what is more important, security or ventilation. If it’s security, you really can’t beat the Larson Secured Elegance to get the security door without the security door look (bars, grating, etc.) If ventilation is your biggest concern, I recommend a Larson Tradewinds with a built in screen that you can pull down when you want ventilation. Though some people don’t like the frame line running through the middle of door. If heat buildup is the main concern, I would say get the door you want and order it with Low-E glass which significantly cuts down heat buildup. If you can’t get a door with Low-E glass, you can always hire a window tinter to add a protective tint to the glass after it is installed.

      Hope this helps!

      Dan, aka, the storm door guy.

      • Caroline says:

        Hi Dan,

        Actually neither security or ventilation is my major concern. I am looking for a quality made, “dual pane” door that offers the most energy efficiency and also will possibly “repel” some of the heat/sunlight that occurs several hours daily at my front door during the summer. I do not want a screen in the door as I have two dogs who would destroy it in a matter of days. Low-E glass would be great but is not an option at my local Lowes or Home Depot with their Larson or Andersen product lines. According to the sales people at both locations they only have the Secure Elegance and the Anderson 4000 series as “dual pane” options. The Larson 349-20 (Secure Elegance) product literature indicates that the door repels 99% of UV rays. The Andersen does not indicate this. I am also wondering whether the “fixed panel” glass with the Larson would be more efficient than a removable panel from Andersen. Thanks!

  • Yvette says:

    I am in the market of a storm/security door but leaning more towards security door. with a security door, there is no ventilation so can the weather elements damage any type of exterior door?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Yvette:

      Yes, the weather will eventually wear out any type of door. If there is no ventilation, one thing to consider is which direction the door faces. The reason I say that is that if the door opening gets a lot of direct sunlight (because it faces south or west), the air that is trapped between your security door and entry door will superheat and can over time cause the front entry door to warp. The solution is just leave the front door open during those times of day.

      Dan, aka, the storm door guy

  • Barry Cook says:

    I have a Pella roll screen storm door. Just replaced the latch mechnanism – door won’t “click” closed – Moved strike plate as far as possible but things still seem out of wack. Had to back off on screw tightening on the internal plate and door handle clearance to door frame to have the new latch snap back out…somethings not quite right. any ideas?

  • Roger says:

    I have two storm doors, about 3 years old, that only came with screen inserts. The supplier says the manufacturer doesn’t have glass inserts. I’m not sure who the manufacturer is and there is no labeling, that I can find, on the doors. I’m want to replace the screens in cold weather with glass inserts. About 72″ tall x 35-3/4″ wide. Any suggestions?

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Roger:

      I would call a glazier (glass company). Assuming the door just has little flanges that you turn to take the screens out, I would say a glazier could make glass inserts rather quickly.

      If you call the phone number on my site (below the title) they can refer you to a reputable glass company in your area for free.

      Hope that helps!

      Dan, aka, the Storm Door Guy

  • John says:

    I don’t want to have to repaint my shutters to match a new storm door. Is there a company that will paint the door a custom color to match the color of my shutters? Thanks!

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      John:

      The short answer is No. The reason being because painting the door voids the manufacturers warranty.

      Now, you may want to try calling the phone number I have on the site below my title. They are a free contractor referral service, and they should be able to help you find a painter in your area that would do it.

      The Storm Door Guy

  • saramm says:

    Sorry, I’m a little confused. I hope I am not replying to the above, as I just want to ask a question.

    Our storm door (Larsen), which we just had installed in Sept. has started rubbing on the frame (the expander piece at the bottom of door). Consequently, it doesn’t always close all the way, and of course all the paint has come off of the frame at the bottom. It was working beautifully until just a couple of days ago. What could have happened, and what should we do to correct this? I don’t have model # handy, but from their website, I would say it’s this one: Model 346-84. Thanks very much!

    Stacy

    • JeepNut says:

      In my experience if the door was working nicely since install and suddenly now the edge is hitting when it closes, scraping the plate rail, it has been a result of the door being “robustly overextended”.
      By that I mean, the door got jerked open hard by the wind. Or the kids banged it wide-open hard. Or the hubby pushed it back too far trying to push the tiller through the doorway. Something like that. Mine is wind. The door opens such that the west wind wants to suck it open. Takes about a 25-30mph+ wind, but it happens. Once the wind pops the latch, BAM! wide open she flies at 30mph.
      When that happens, the mounting rails can actually become distorted. Door frame had to be completely unmounted, the aluminum mounting rails “adjusted” back to 90degree angles, and remounted. The door (while off) has 8 screws probably 2 on each of the corners. These can be loosened and the door can be “resquared” and then rehung. But if you’re not familiar with that process, or REAL handy w/ tools, etc. I don’t recommend it.

  • Kate Luxemburg says:

    I bought a new back door from Champion, two panels at the bottom topped by a large clear window that begins 38″ from the floor. Lots of sunlight– that was my main criterion. I included a storm door in the same order and Champion supplied Larson. At the Champion showroom, I chose a Larson door that has two glass panels, with the top panel able to drop down leaving a screened opening at the top. I did not see the Larson door next to the Champion door when I chose it. I MISTAKENLY assumed the divider between the two storm door panels would be positioned below the level of the window in the Champion door– because Champion should know that people who order max window do want an uninterrupted view. The divider is 4″ wide– very wide– and begins 39″ from the floor. The divider looks awful through the Champion door window. Champion has agreed that I will find a storm door that looks better with the Champion door. Your main page mentions that some storm doors allow bottom panel as well as top panel to be moved. I can’t get that feature with Larson, so I am writing to ask what company makes such a door that you recommend. I have come to accept that will see the divider between storm door panels through the Champion door’s window, but it should be thin, not 4″ wide. I can’t have fullview because I have large dogs that will destroy a screen at the bottom of the door. (Before door upgrade for weather control. I used an inexpensive screen door with the bottom half divided vertically; and detached the screen in half of the bottom half to create a flap, allowing them to go in and out from the deck.) I want to raise the bottom glass panel high enough to let the dogs pass through. No screen or removable screen on the bottom. Clear view screen on the top. Thinnest possible divider between the panels. Thank you for info.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Kate:
      The kind of door I was describing is called a Ventilating door. That may not serve your purpose though because the screen is normally just 1 panel, meaning your dogs would destroy it since it would be a full-length screen. You may want to try a Pella door. I am thinking of the Pella Montgomery, found at Lowe’s stores. It has a thinner line in the middle of the glass (narrower window frame) and may look better than the Larson door you have. Unfortunately any door with 2 panes of moveable glass will have a line that you’ll be able to see from the window frame just because they can’t have exposed glass because of safety.
      Hope this helps!

      The Storm Door Guy

  • Phil says:

    You mention standard sizes for storm door of up to 96″ for 8′ doors.
    Any suggestions on who actually makes such doors? I can’t find anything that tall.

    • The Storm Door Guy says:

      Larson and Pella both do, I am sure Anderson and Emco do as well. It will have to be a special order door because of the size, neither of the big box stores (Lowe’s or Home Depot) carry them in stock. You can try and call them directly at the numbers listed on the website and they should be able to direct you to a local dealer if you are not near a retail store. Hope this helps!

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